Harry Potter in Chinese, Japanese & Vietnamese Translation
envelope
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Chapter Titles in Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese

 

Chapter 5: Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes

 

(For the romanisation of Chinese and Japanese, see Transliteration. To understand the writing systems of CJV, see Writing Systems. For word order notes, see Word Order)

Where a Vietnamese word has been borrowed from Chinese, the original Chinese character is shown in parentheses.

 

Chinese (Mainland) 韦斯莱魔法把戏
Wéisīlái mófǎ bǎxì
韦斯莱 Wéisīlái = 'Weasley'.
魔法 mófǎ = 'magic'.
把戏 bǎxì = 'cheap trick, game'.
Weasley's magic tricks
Chinese (Taiwan) 衛氏巫師法寶
Wèishì wūshī fǎbǎo
Wèi = 'Weasley' (short for 衛斯理 Wèisīlǐ ).
shì = 'family, clan'.
巫師 wūshī = 'wizard'.
法寶 fǎbǎo = 'jewel of the law' = 'magic weapon/formula'.
Weasley family's wizard magic weapons
Japanese ウィーズリーWウィザードWウィーズW
Wiizurii Wizādo Wiizu (WWW)
ウィーズリー Wiizurii = 'Weasley'.
ウィザード Wizādo = 'Wizard'
ウィーズ Wiizu = 'Wheeze'.

Wiizurii Wizaado Wiizu (WWW)
Vietnamese Mánh phù thủy của nhà Weasley mánh = 'trick, ruse'.
phù thủy = 'sorceror, wizard'.
của = 'of'.
nhà = 'house'.
Weasley (pronunciation: Guýt-li)
Wizard's tricks of the house of Weasley

To translate the word 'wheeze', which means something like 'an old joke', the Mainland and Vietnamese translators use words referring to a trick or a prank.

The Taiwanese translator uses the Buddhist term 法寶 fǎbǎo, 'jewel of the law', which actually refers to the Buddhist sutras. By extension (thanks to certain magical powers attributed to Buddhism) it means a 'magic weapon or formula'.

The Japanese translator transliterates the three words 'Weasley Wizard Wheeze' into katakana, adding a 'W' above each word to indicate the alliterative effect. Japanese readers would be hard put to make sense of this. Apart from the fact that it involves the Weasleys and is an English expression, it doesn't say much. Understanding would come only with Ron's explanation half way through the chapter. While not the best method of translation, it does give a good illustration of the great tolerance of the Japanese for katakana vocabulary (i.e., words transliterated from English).

(A summary of this chapter can be found at Harry Potter Facts. Detailed notes on the chapter can be found at Harry Potter Lexicon)

back Chapter 4
Back to Top